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Parka

Qusuŋŋaq “outer parka fur outside”
Language: North Slope Iñupiaq

In August, annuġaaksrat annuġarriaksrat turġutilaaŋat naammaguuruq (fur gathered for winter parkas is just right, the thickness of fur is just right). August-mi (in August), last part of July.

—Jane Brower, 2002

Iñupiat who lived on the coast traded sea mammal hides and blubber to interior villages in exchange for the pelts of caribou, wolves, wolverines, foxes, and mountain sheep. The sheepskins used for this man’s Arctic coast parka probably came from the Brooks Range. Men’s parkas were shorter than women’s and cut straight across on the bottom. The ruff around the hood has three layers of fur consisting of wolverine, wolf belly, and wolf back, from the inner layer to the outer, respectively. The dark-colored manusiñiq (tusk-shaped gores on the chest) are made of caribou fur and the bottom of the coat is trimmed with wolverine.

Culture: Iñupiaq
Region: Northwest Alaska
Object Category: Clothing
Dimensions: Length 20cm
Accession Date: 1892
Source: J. H. Turner (collector)
Museum: National Museum of Natural History
Museum ID Number: E153734